Razor Sharp Unlimited Knife Store and Sharpening Service Tampa Florida

Some top choices in specialty knives shapes & their uses

It's true that not everyone needs every knife. But if you love to cook, sooner or later, you're going to start eyeing specialty knives. Because the right tool at the right time really can make all the difference. Here are some of our favorite "nice to have" knives—in addition to the Japanese styles we discussed last time.

BREAD KNIFE. It’s a crime to ruin a fresh loaf of bread by smashing it beneath the blade of a dull knife. The wide, “low frequency” serrations on Shun bread knives provide the power you need to gently cut through a crusty loaf without tearing the tender interior. And it works equally well on soft breads and even pastries.
VEGETABLE CLEAVER.Sometimes known as a Chinese cleaver, this squared knife has a very wide blade—and every part of it is put to use. The edge is used to prep vegetables, especially larger ones such as cabbage. Yet some cooks find their cleaver nimble enough for almost every kind of slicing and dicing. The flat of the blade is great for smashing garlic cloves. But don't use it on joints, bones, or meat; a meat cleaver is made for that.
BUTCHERY KNIFEThis is the perfect knife for boning and trimming meat, as well as portioning it. The 6-inch length is the precise length needed for efficient butchery—not a quarter inch more, not a quarter of an inch less. It's also handy for anything you'd do with a utility knife—from trimming vegetables to slicing salami. 
SLICING KNIFEThe slicing knife's longer length, narrower blade, and Shun-sharp edge you can make long, even slices without tearing or sawing. This kind of clean cut keeps more of the meat juices—and thus more of the flavor—inside the meat, rather than pooling on the cutting board. 
ULTIMATE UTILITY KNIFEThis shape is unique to Shun and our parent company, Kai. The cutting edge has low-frequency serrations that slice delicate thin-skinned fruits and vegetables with ease. The wide blade with its rounded tip makes it a great knife for spreading mayo on a sandwich, then the serrations work like a bread knife to cut the sandwich without tearing. It may not look traditional, but try it and find out how often you'll find yourself reaching for this multi-function knife.
BONING/FILLET KNIFE. Like it's name says, this knife is adept at these two key kitchen chores. For boning, the narrow, sharp, curved blade gets in close to the bone, making it easy to separate meat from bone. When filleting fish, the blade's 6-inch length glides through the fish, quickly removing bones and skin. Plus, the narrow blade reduces the drag as you cut

Written by David Zaratzian — August 25, 2018

Some top choices in specialty knives shapes & their uses

Some top choices in specialty knives shapes & their uses It's true that not everyone needs every knife. But if you love to cook, sooner or later, you're going to...

How to use the most common Japanese knife styles

Traditional Japanese knife styles Japanese culinary tradition calls for a different knife for just about every task. Frankly, the variety can be a little daunting. That's why Shun offers a...

What's the best tang for a kitchen knife?

Many of us have had it drilled into our heads by one pundit or another that the only good tang is a full tang. But that's not necessarily so. For...

Newsletter

We promise to only send you good things.